Tuesday, 27 March 2018

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass, by Lewis Carroll

Alice's Adventures
Weary of her storybook, one "without pictures or conversations," the young and imaginative Alice follows a hasty hare underground--to come face-to-face with some of the strangest adventures and most fantastic characters in all of literature.

The Ugly Duchess, the Mad Hatter, the weeping Mock Turtle, the diabolical Queen of Hearts, the Cheshire Cat--each more eccentric than the last--could only have come from that master of sublime nonsense, Lewis Carroll.

In penning this brilliant burlesque of children's literature, Carroll has written a farcical satire of rigid Victorian society, an arresting parody of the fears, anxieties, and complexities of growing up.

Carroll was one of the few adult writers to successfully enter the children's world of make-believe: where the impossible becomes possible, the unreal--real, and where the height of adventure is limited only by the depths of imagination.


What a delightfully strange read!

I know the story of Alice in Wonderland. I heard about it as a child and I've seen the movies, but it's taken until now for me to actually read the book. (It's amazing what procrastination will do to you, I was supposed to be studying so I decided to read this instead). I didn't know quite what to expect, but I loved it!

The illustrations were quite something which was an aspect of Alice that I'd never seen before, I never knew that it was full of such weird and wonderful pictures (and am I the only one that desperately wants to print them out and colour them in?). My favourite part though was definitely the nonsensical style. I don't know how something can make so little sense, yet so much sense at the same time... Does that even make sense? I don't know.
And the poetry! The poetry was so much fun. I'd already had a taste of it because I'd seen the movies, but being able to read it all was everything. It was funny and insane, and if there was anyone else around me when I came across a poem then there was no way I wasn't going to read it out to them. (sorry guys!)

So the allusions to drugs throughout this entire book.... I've heard a lot of bits and pieces here and there about Lewis Carroll being in some sort of drug haze while he wrote about Alice and I don't know if it's true or not, but it wouldn't surprise me at all. Never mind that everything was already so strange and disjointed, there were a lot of allusions to drugs. From the caterpillar smoking a hookah pipe to eating a mushroom and drinking potions that alter who you are... I just think it's a funny theory especially since it's concerning a children's book.

Also, I will always be obsessed with the Cheshire Cat.

Do you know the story of Alice? Have you read the book? It's probably one of the strangest things I've ever read... What do you think was the weirdest part?

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